Frequently Asked Questions

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Tips you can use in addition to medications.

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Some people with celiac disease may not have symptoms. The undamaged part of their small intestine is able to absorb enough nutrients to prevent symptoms, However, people without symptoms are still at risk for the complications of celiac disease.

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Primary Prevention of Colon & Rectal Cancer:
Colorectal cancer is a major cause of death in Westernized countries. Prevention of colon & rectal cancer has entered the mainstream media and hopefully is here to stay. In the past few years, much has been heard about the need for routine evaluation and screening. Katie Couric has become an outspoken advocate for the benefits of colonoscopy. The goal has been on the early detection of polyps and cancers.

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Most people have in their colons small pouches that bulge outward through weak spots, like an inner tube that pokes through weak places in a tire. Each pouch is called a diverticuli. Pouches are diverticulam. The condition of having diverticula is called diverticulosis. About half of all Americans age 60 to 80, and almost everyone over age 80, have diverticulosis.

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The Fundamentals of The Gluten-Free Diet

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Information You Should Know About Irritable Bowel Syndrome:
The symptoms of Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) are due to the disorder in the function and not in the structure or integrity of the intestinal tract. The exact nature of the symptoms varies, depending on the location of the affected part of the intestine.

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NSAID List (Non-Steriodal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs)

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If you are one of the millions of people who suffer from acid-related gastrointestinal discomfort, there are things you can do to improve your health and enhance the quality of your life.

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Hemorrhoids are swollen but normally present blood vessels in and around the anus and lower rectum that stretch under pressure, similar to varicose veins in the legs.

Many anorectal problems, including fissures, fistulae, abscesses or irritation and itching (pruritus ani), have similar symptoms and are incorrectly referred to as hemorrhoids.

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Capsule Endoscopy (CE) lets your physician examine the lining of the middle part of your gastrointestinal tract, which includes the three portions of the small intestine (duodenum, jejunum, ileum). Your physician will use a pill sized video capsule called and endoscope, which has its own lens and light source and will view the images on a video monitor. You might hear your physician or other medical staff refer to capsule endoscopy as small bowel endoscopy, capsule endoscopy or wireless endoscopy.

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Colonoscopy enables your doctor to examine the lining of your colon (large intestine) for abnormalities by inserting a flexible tube as thick as your finger into your anus and slowly advancing it into the rectum and colon. If your doctor has recommended a colonoscopy, this information will give you a basic understanding of the procedure – how it’s performed, how it can help and what side effects you might experience. It can’t answer all of your questions since much depends on the individual patient and the physician.

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Fatty liver is not a disease, but a pathological finding. A more appropriate term is fatty filtration of the liver.

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Flexible sigmoidoscopy lets your doctor examine the lining of the rectum and a portion of the colon (large intestine) by inserting a flexible tube about the thickness of your finger into the anus and slowly advanced into the rectum and lower part of the colon.

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An upper endoscopy lets your physician examine the lining of the upper part of your gastrointestinal tract, which includes the esophagus, stomach and duodenum (first portion of the small intestine). Your physician will use a thin, flexible tube called an endoscope, which has its own lens and light source, and will view the images on a video monitor. You might hear you physician or other medical staff refer to an upper endoscopy as an upper GI endoscopy, esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) or panendoscopy.

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Everyone has gas. Burping or passing gas through the rectum is normal. Because it is embarrassing to burp or pass gas, many people believe they pass gas too often or have too much gas. It is rare for a person to have too much gas.

How much gas the body makes and how sensitive a person is to gas in the large intestine have an effect on how uncomfortable having gas is.

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